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Mike Rowe: Should I Go to College?

Mike Rowe

Mike Rowe is probably best known for his Discovery Channel series, “Dirty Jobs”.  Over the past few years, Rowe has increasingly become a spokesperson for higher education alternatives.  He has done this by posing a simple question you may ask yourself.  “Should I go to college?”

At Carolina Career College, we often relay the same sentiment as Mike Rowe when it comes to traditional college.  He’s not saying it is bad.  He’s not telling anyone that wants to go to college to avoid it.  Many of us that work here hold degrees.

The real issue, as Rowe points out in this video, is the difference between saying “You need to get educated” (which is true) and “You have to attend a 4-year college” (which is not).  For whatever reason one chooses not to attend a 4-year school (including the expense and potential mountain of debt), there should not be a stigma attached.

Rowe names many trades that can pay competitive salaries, like welding and sanitation.  These are not trades that require a traditional 4-year degree.  Many may be surprised to learn that IT careers also fall in this “skills based” category and may not require a traditional higher education path.

Many working in an IT career have earned IT certifications, from companies such as CompTIA, Microsoft, and Cisco, which validate their skills to employers.  A vocational school like Carolina Career College offers IT certification training and career placement assistance.  This can lead to a potentially lucrative IT career without many of the potential pitfalls of a traditional college education.

Schedule a tour to learn more about IT career training opportunities.  Want to get started on a Career Action Plan and explore options before talking to someone?  Try My Guidance Coach now.

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